Strangeland

Sometimes I think I live on an alien world; an odd, foreign landscape sculpted by unearthly tides and weather conditions. I don’t think this is a far off thought either. Not that I actually believe I’ve been whisked away a la Wizard of Oz and dropped onto another planet. But if you were to take a look at the wetlands near my neighborhood you might cock your head to the side and see the resemblance to the Riddick movies. I put some pictures below to help strengthen my case.

The wetlands on the Eastern Shore where I live are protected.  There are stretches of wetlands all over the place, some small, some large.  All that’s left of this particular area of wetlands is what you see in these photos…just a very small patch surrounded by farmland. These are not your mom and pop type farms with geese being chased by pigs in the front yard and cows getting milked by some sweet ol’ Meemaw. These are the industrial suckers; farms that grow corn in bulk either to sell to large manufacturers or to grocery store chains.

Pretty bland scenery outside of the wetlands, but this little parcel of protected land more than makes up for it visually on its own. In winter when it’s all iced over or summer when it’s deep into a drought, this bit of wetlands looks like something out of a crazy sci-fi movie. There are incongruous lumps of grass that rise and fall out of the earth and dead trees vaulting up over my head. If I had to sum up the way it looks in one word I’d feel pretty confident going with “bizarre.”  The photos I was able to capture on my cell phone simply don’t do it justice.

Wetlands final 1

wetlands in winter 2

As I mentioned previously, these wetlands are supposed to be protected. While no loggers are in there actively sawing down the trees and no one’s pumping water from the ground or building apartments on the site, I have a sneaking suspicion that runoff from the farms just a stone’s throw away has been seeping into the earth slowly polluting this miniature self-contained biome. It’s obvious that the water is going bad and the trees are dead, which is terribly sad. Although I understand the need for the industrialized farms, how they provide food to many and all, watching the slow decline of a once beautiful and entertainingly unique little spot of land is still quite disheartening. These wetlands were once home to a menagerie of wildlife — bald eagles, herons, cranes, and other beautiful species were frequent visitors. They’re gone now, at least from this place.  I’m sure the poisoned water and the dead trees don’t have the same appeal they once had as a thriving ecosystem. At least I have these pictures to share and look back on when I want to be reminded of my own little piece of alien life here on earth.

Wetlands final 2

wetlands in winter

11 thoughts on “Strangeland

  1. That’s rather sad. I hope other tracts of wetlands fare better. Feeding people is important but so is balance.

    • I agree with you, there needs to be more emphasis on preserving the environment. It’s a shame because when areas like this are destroyed, it’s not just the ground that’s poisoned, it effects the animals that would’ve called the area home as well. I’ll check out the award, thanks!

      • Yes, us humans are pretty good at messing up the nature around. I’m amazed how people can not realise that doing so, not only effect nature and animals, but it will ultimately also effect the humans future…

        Will be fun to see your answers on the award questions, if you choose to accept 🙂

  2. People need to be more aware in general of how we treat the earth. We are just so used to doing and taking what we want without thinking about the consequences of our actions. It is sad to see….good post x

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